Tag Archives: death

Quarantine Musings #9

What would you do if someone tells you that you only have a couple of hours to live? – Me? I don’t think I would do anything different, other than being grateful for everything I am blessed with.

Don’t worry, things are fine over here as of now. We are expecting a cyclone in some hours, on top of us living in the epicentre of the COVID-19 outbreak in our country. Monsoon has apparently arrived earlier than expected. Yesterday morning we woke up with the pleasant petrichor of the early morning – first – rain of the season. It’s cloudy since yesterday, which is kind of a sudden change in the climate after a really hot summer in May. Take care, folks!

— Suri


What are Quarantine Musings? Just some random, trivial, light-hearted (or maybe even deep?) thoughts that pass through my mind during these lockdown days.

Unanswered Questions…

How do you console someone whose dad has passed away?  How do you ask them if they’re okay? How do you show that you genuinely care? How do you know what they really feel? And how does a person accept death of a loved one, in their early twenties?

What is life? We are born alone, we die alone. We live in the intermediate stage. But the living stage is how we define our life. Life; we make a few connections with souls around us in our lifetime. Some turns out good, some okay, but mostly not so good. But how does it matter at the end? Why end, when people face a severe loss  or difficultly during their life, they feel alone even then. As alone as we’ve come and as alone as we would leave. Why then, do we generate such a huge wave of feelings, during our transitional phase, the phase between birth and death?

My friend’s father had to embrace death a few days back. He had been affected by a medical condition called Sepsis. I wasn’t even aware of this condition before. She isn’t my close friend. Neither have I ever met her father. But her story pierced me. The loss of a parent when someone is a mere two decades old is very saddening.

Our exams are going on. We have our exams for like 25 days, almost a month, with 5-6 days holiday before each subject’s paper. And it was in the middle of all this that she had to face such a sudden loss. She’s strong, I’m told. The loss didn’t stop her from giving her exams. She’s still preparing for her upcoming papers. I do respect the strength in her and her family.

We never know what the next day might bring us. We never know if we might even live up to see the next day. I know it’s a cliché sentence but it’s so true: Live each day as if it’s your last. Anger, envy, grevience, hatred won’t do you any good. Live each day with warmth, happiness and love. And work towards spreading the love, it’s essential in today’s technological world, where people often forget about human emotions.

– Suri

Death.

image

Death is depicted so easily in movies and in books. You hear the sound of a gun-shot, or a hit by a rod on the back of the victim’s head; and the immediate next moment, you see him lying cold. And dead.
Is it really so easy to portray death? Can death actually be imitated? I think not. It’s a much deeper concept.

All kinds of opinions to this are invited. Let me know what my fellow bloggers think about this. 🙂

– Suri